Gunner Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,354 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Newest addition to my "Boys Rifle" collection. This is a CJ Hamilton Model 27 , 22 short and long, 14 3/4 bbl in pretty rough shape. JGB these gun were produced between 1906 and 1930 in Plymouth, Mich. Known as tip ups because the breech breaks like a shotgun made from blued stamped steel. Stock and forearm are made out of a flat birch boad with slightly rounded edges and stained with a walnut colored oil. This is and example of the "later model" produced after 1907 and since there were no serial #s the year of production is lost forever.









 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,063 Posts
That is a cool little rifle Chance. Neat to see that old girl turn back up. I bet the stories that thing could tell could go on a long while.

The only thing I wondered about when I saw that was at 14 3/4, does that qualify as Class 3, short barreled rifle, or were the old guns exempt from that?
 

·
Site Founder
Joined
·
25,453 Posts
I would hope they are exempt, but with the feds who knows. :roll:

I can only imagine the look on the boys face who recieved that way back when. Back when life was good. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,354 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
These guns date back to a time before, even, income tax so there was no money to throw away on alphabet do nothing except harrass taxpayers agencies like the atf. The rifles were made short for use by boys 5 yrs and older. I have a friend here in Sun City who grew in the PHX area and had a Stevens Favorite he would break down, put in a paper shopping bag (yes they did make paper bags out of paper at one time), get on the bus and head up to the park at Pinnacle Peak to hunt rabits. When he was done hunting he would put the gun and the dead rabbits back in the bag, get on the bus and head home. He sated doing this when he was 12.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,098 Posts
...when I was in 1-6th grade, if you were going hunting with a buddy after school, you'd bring your shotgun on the bus...leave it in your locker at the back of the classroom...go home with him on his bus...no problem then....people had common sense....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,354 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Found this copy of an old Hamiliton Rifle Co ad in the 2004 Standard Catalog of Firearms. Check out the Model 27 price, a whopping buck seventy-five, 35 1/2 times less than I paid for it. But then the new ones didn't include the rust and corrosion that came with mine.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,063 Posts
Chance if you look at the add, you can see the scouts in the drawing all have bayonets on the end of their rifles. Now those scouts aren't kidding around. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,354 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
They do call this a "Military Type rifle" but mine doesnt have a bayonet attachment point. I may just have to take it back. :lol: The 2nd rifle in the ad, Model 027, went into production in 1908, two years after the M27 so this ad had to be from sometime after 1908, probably in the teens after the fighting had started in europe kicking off WWI.
 

·
Site Founder
Joined
·
25,453 Posts
That's funny, a bunch of scouts running around with guns with bayonets on them. :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,909 Posts
I think that is probably the rifle that my wife's grandpa used to shoot rabbits with on his way to school. He said it was a tiny, little, break open, single shot .22. He and some of the other boys would shoot rabbits on the walk to school during the winter. The teacher would make rabbit stew for the kids lunch. I love hearing his stories of growing up in Minnesota. I can just envision that one room school heated by a fire with a tasty pot of rabbit stew simmering, while a teacher goes about her lessons. Kids had to grow up fast back then, but what a time they must have had.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,354 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Good possibilty b, they were made in his backyard and there were around 500,000 of them sold between 1906 and 1930. Overall length of mine is 29 1/2 in and weighs about 2 1/2 lbs.

An speaking of bayonets, Hamilton did make them, at least for the Model 7 which was the first rifle produced by the company beginning in 1899.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,354 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Took it out yesterday and shot a bunch of 22 low veloctiy shorts through it. Fun gun and fairly accurate out to about 25 yards, okay,maybe 15. Thought it would be a perfect little gun for my grandaughter but she didn't want to go shooting.

Kind of a lazy day sitting on the tailgate of my sons pickup most of the day and shooting at old shot gun shells laying on the ground. Cleaned a big area in front of us, amazing how accurate those single sixes are.

And speaking of single sixes we put a lot of rounds through the "new" six and a half inch old model I got last week.

Most of the day was rimfire shooting but we did manage to put about 50 rounds thru the Marlin Guide Gun and some hot stuff thru the Marlin 1894 44. And then we both had our standard hand guns we alsways shoot when we go out. Son's is a 44 mag Super Blackhawk while mine is my 45LC Blackhawk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,095 Posts
Sounds like a fun relaxin day!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,354 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yup, yesterday was one of those really nice laid back days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
boogys

the rifle in the pic is a model 35 note the wood goes almost to the end of the barrel the model 7 does't have any wood
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,626 Posts
the rifle in the pic is a model 35 note the wood goes almost to the end of the barrel the model 7 does't have any wood
The post is from 5 /2009 and Chance is the most knowledgeable I know alive I know on Hamilton rifles . I was hoping some would know where he was .
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top