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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is working well, for this job anyway. Spray, wait a minute, and wipe off. Leaves behind an oily film, which saves me doing it separate. I'm using up a lot of shop towels.
Guns were listed excellent / unissued. Now that I can see better, there are a few scratches and shiny corners.
I've done everything but frames and mags. Taking a pizza break.
 

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I would want to put a light coat of gun oil on them once you finish and a small amount of grease on the rails then time to hit the range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
The Goo Gone oily film is pretty thick, you have to wipe it and it's still like you've wiped everything with 30 weight. I couldn't get to the triggers, so they are seeping a little. So all I've done is oil the usual places like I'd went to the range. The slides are pretty slick without grease, so I'll see after I do shoot them.
I've got some dummy rounds that are a normal cartridge with no powder and a rubber primer. They aren't cycling well just jacking the slide, so I hope the real thing does better. The mags are really hard to load past five, and it holds eight. The rounds want to nosedive instead of butt first. And the .32 loader I use for my Guardians is too small for these .32 mags (?). I need to figure out a larger version of it. Maybe a 9mm. Pistol was / is made in 9mm, but that's never been imported.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
When I have used grease on rails, I've just used hardware store white lithium on a cotton swab.
I would wipe a coating of it on the bolt of my Ruger Mark III, as that was a large contact area.
 

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I'll share some of my experience if that's OK. Some years back a friend of mine was working on his Garand. He was about to order some exotic lube for his M-1. One of his mentors pointed out the stuff was Mobil 1 synthetic grease. A tube will last a long time. I put a very light film on moving parts. It was not expensive at the parts store.

When I was a kid a neighbor introduced me to RIG. RIG is a for keeping rust off gun metal mainly. I use it on reloading dies and things like that. RIG works very well and is not hard to use. It does not make a mess. Yes, they had guns when I was a kid:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My .32 Guardian pistol manual just says, "Gun oil or other similar lubricants should be applied lightly to all moving parts, including the firing pin and areas of the slide subject to friction." All the .32 Zastava says is, "For lubrication of the barrel and other parts general purpose gun oil should be used. In lack of this oil, any anti-corrosive oil can be used."

Some people use Mobil 1 motor oil for guns. Some use WD-40. When I finished cleaning cosmoline from my "new" pistols, I sprayed the inside of the frame and slide with WD. Wiped it out good, it still leaves a film, and I oiled the usual places with Hoppe's oil.

Guns as a kid. Were they flintlocks or cap & ball ? :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
LOL. I feel like when I was a kid, guns were at least the big caliber rimfires. :) I'm actually pushing 66, most days feel a lot older. The '57 Chevy Bel Air came out two months before I did.
 
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BC: I use a common brake part cleaner for getting at grease. You gotta be careful. That stuff can splash into your eyes. I got special of two cans for one at an auto-parts store. One of my favorite tools or cleaning guns are common tooth brushes.

Age: I was just starting High School when you were born-Kid. :) :oops:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
You don't look a day past 50. :rolleyes:
Three handy tools for me:
I have a few child size toothbrushes I picked up at a dollar store. Great for small spaces.
Nylon percolator brushes found at a flea market. Meant to clean the hollow stem. Main use for them as a magazine brush, but they fit barrels, frames, most any place long and narrow.
Saved Norelco brushes when the shavers died, the little stiff bristles are good cleaning grooves in parts.
 

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I have an old custom stocked 1903 Springfield. The original buttplate and grip cap were gone. We had a guy who did nice stock work. A friend had this guy use my rifle as a pattern for building a rifle. I had the rifle for many years. The stock was black in color.

It turns out the stock was black from cosmoline. Stock guy told of how difficult it was to clean the grease out of the stock. He used a solvent. I didn't like that but it was a done deal.

For me the best way to clean grease out of stocks is to use heat. The grease will boil up out of the wood. This heating has to be careful not to scorch the wood.

Also, it is important not to harm military marks in the stock. I cleaned up a Trap Door Springfield that had several names carved into the stock. I made the choice not to do anything to those names. Kinda interesting.

Added: Kid my adding was wrong. I was in the US Army when you were born!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So you're at least a 1938 model? Life was pretty good 1935-40, then it went downhill for while. :(
You keep calling me Kid, I'll call you Pops ! ..... :D
My first name starts with T, but I'm not another Terry.
I've been curious, does your Mowgli come from Kipling, or something else?
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I used to tell my wife, every time she wanted a piece of furniture, that I could be happy with a cot, card table, and two folding chairs. She'd look at me sideways.
 
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My big thing is comfort. If it costs me money so be it. I buy quality and that last longer. In this made in China world I look for Made in USA as not only keep the jobs here but the quality is better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Stuff made outside the US is mostly to blame for the cargo ship back-up, and part of the trucking shortage. A lot of your truck traffic going home was foreign goods.
I guess my Yugoslav guns and Cambodian Uncle Mike holsters were part of it.
My Aguila ammo takes an 1100 mile ride just from the Mexican plant to the Texas warehouse. What I just ordered went to Utah first, Sportsman's real warehouse, so that's 3800 miles from factory to me, and I got free shipping. :cool:
You wonder how it survives the trip, but what I've bought off the shelf here makes the same trip and looks fine.
 

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The furniture we got for FL we bought in Panama City and their factory was in Mississippi. It's good stuff. I looked up the chairs we have here in NH, Stressless and they were made in Norway. Oh well.
 

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Nobody explains that buying from China like we do takes away from out gross national product. Us buying from China is like Europeans buying oil and natural gas from Russia. Look where these folks are today!
 
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