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Tactical Prius
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Henry came in today and I'm very happy. I'll clean her and put an optic on to zero tomorrow. She's racks like a sheet of butter. I love it.
Can't wait to put some round down for a short break in (I don't particularly believe in breaking in a new barrel yet I do it) then find the right gr for zero at 100
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My idea of "breaking in" a barrel is, for the first 200 rounds I take a break between shots, not letting the barrel get hot. I run a dry brush through after each 25-30 rounds. At 200 it gets a thorough cleaning.
 

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Tactical Prius
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My idea of "breaking in" a barrel is, for the first 200 rounds I take a break between shots, not letting the barrel get hot. I run a dry brush through after each 25-30 rounds. At 200 it gets a thorough cleaning.
This is my issue with barrel break in. Barrel is hardend steel. Ammo is either lead, copperr or copper lead. People are reloading with zinc now but I won't do that. I have lots of lead. Because you can't, IMO, do anthing other that removing a rare barb/junk, from drilling, in no way can you change the barrel with lesser hardened material.
I just don't see it. I do, because I always try to listen to those that know more than me, and go through the age old process of break in. Shoot clean, shoot clean, shoot clean....so on. I've just never believed in the process. I think it just sounds good to say you "seasoned the barrel".
I do want a majority to agree on one way or the other.
I'm asking for opinions and thanks ahead of time if you respond.
 

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Lead is softer than steel, sure. Just means that if you take equal amounts of both and keep rubbing them together, the lead will disappear first, but the steel will still be worn. Barrels of any caliber eventually get "shot out", but it takes a lot of shooting. Think of the Grand Canyon being created by water flowing, or a machine shop cutting steel with a high pressure water stream.
 

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Tactical Prius
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Lead is softer than steel, sure. Just means that if you take equal amounts of both and keep rubbing them together, the lead will disappear first, but the steel will still be worn. Barrels of any caliber eventually get "shot out", but it takes a lot of shooting. Think of the Grand Canyon being created by water flowing, or a machine shop cutting steel with a high pressure water stream.
Thank you so much for responding. I've just finished cleaning out the factory/shipping grease out of the gun, like you do with every new gun. Really not that much but always good to do it. That's like why I'm asking about breakin of a .17. I want people to tell me I'm wrong.
I've always done exactly what people say is best because, I've never owned a .17 and need advice from folks like you. My Ruger precision 6.5 creedmoor/grendel/etc, I've gone by the book because the rifles were so expensive and again, those that know advised me to. Growing up, we never had a new gun (heck anything...Ha) but we took very good care with what we had. I love cleaning guns anyway but the breakin gets tedious when I'm so eager to drop brass.
I'm not that bright but I've seen high pressure water used to cut steel. What do you use when you break in a small cal rifle like the .17? Let me know if will.
I like this forum and sure hope more people get involved in posting. I'm going to start promoting it on some other gun forums.
Thank you so much for responding. I hope we can get lots of post when a question is posed or an interesting topic is up. I love range pictures, gun cleanin, new gun stuff....all of it, so I hope people post.
You are a good man
 

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Tactical Prius
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My idea of "breaking in" a barrel is, for the first 200 rounds I take a break between shots, not letting the barrel get hot. I run a dry brush through after each 25-30 rounds. At 200 it gets a thorough cleaning.
Thanks buddy. I appreciate you taking note of my post and question.
Please give your opinion on anything I post. I've never learned anything from being right. Mostly from being wrong until someone tells me the right or better way, and I've always been grateful even when I disagree.
 

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I clean it and shoot it. When I'm done I clean it again. Repeat. In short I don't do anything really. Like BC said though I don't overheat the BBL, 3 to 5 shot groups and then cool it down.
 

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I should have said "frequent breaks", I really didn't mean after each individual shot......o_O
 
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