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Discussion Starter #1
Henry has a new 30-30 on their website...I think 30-30 or .44 Mag....Henry's quality beats Marlin now.....sharp look, though the octagon barrel had to grow on me....
 

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I like the octagonal barrel! My next levergun (and I have a feeling there WILL be a next levergun :D ) will have an octagonal barrel.

 

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Although the Henry is a nice looking rifle BTW those are .22 cal Henry's in the picture (see under tube)... I'll take the Marlin 1895 Cowboy or the Marlin 1894 Cowboy.

Marlin 1895 Cowboy 45-70 with 26" Tapered octagon barrel with deep cut Ballard type rifling.


Marlin 1894 Cowboy in .45 Colt, .357 mag/38 Spl or .44 Mag or .44 Spl Tapered octagon barrel with deep cut Ballard type rifling.


I simply love Marlins, and I'm not saying the Henry Repeating Rifles are bad neither, I just perfer a Marlin. Now iffin I was shooting SASS or CASS type of matches, then my leverguns would be more period correct with and including cresant butt-plate.
 

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I'd like to have that 45 Colt lever gun! Do they have lead fouling problems too?
 

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Bountyhunter said:
I'd like to have that 45 Colt lever gun! Do they have lead fouling problems too?
As with any cast loads, unless they are gas checked keep your FPS down so leading does not occure.
 

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I only have one oct barrel lever gun (Marlin .32 H&R Mag) and there is a reason. The are HEAVY. Looked at a 26" Marlin 1895 45/70 Cowboy the other day and was shocked at the weight. The Henry's with oct barrels are very very heavy also, but do look good.
 

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I held a long barreled rifle the other day.... my shoulder did not like it one bit. My Rolling Block has a 32" octagon barrel and the rifle weighs in at 11.5 pounds..... I even carried this hunting on the prairie here in Montana one year, and was very sore after the day was over, very heavy and un-used right now.

Give me my Guide Gun any day of the week.
 

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BH
I have a Marlin 1894 45LC, 20 inch bbl, with ballard rifling that shoots my standard blackhawk loads of 250 gr RNFP (Missouri Bullet Co) pushed by 8.3 Unique. This is a deadly accurate load at 50 yds with nary a trace of leading and just enough recoil to know you are shooting a big gun.
 

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chance said:
BH
I have a Marlin 1894 45LC, 20 inch bbl, with ballard rifling that shoots my standard blackhawk loads of 250 gr RNFP (Missouri Bullet Co) pushed by 8.3 Unique. This is a deadly accurate load at 50 yds with nary a trace of leading and just enough recoil to know you are shooting a big gun.
Keeping them cast bullets mild and not wild will do well not to lead. I know some guys like to push them but unless they are Laser Cast that has silver in them to increase hardness, keep em mild. Aint nothin wrong with a BIG slow bullet.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Did someone say .45ACP??? I have a fascination with big, slow bullets...SMACK!!!
 

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What is ballard rifling??
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Marlin's used Ballard rifling some ...Micro-Groove some...from Winkypedia:

Marlin Firearms
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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This article does not cite any references or sources. (August 2007)
Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unverifiable material may be challenged and removed.
Marlin Firearms Company
Type Private
Founded 1870
Headquarters North Haven, Connecticut, USA
Industry Firearms
Products Firearms, weapons
Website www.marlinfirearms.com

Marlin Model 60 22LR rifle manufactured in 1982
Marlin Model 1894C — .357 Magnum carbineThe Marlin Firearms Company of North Haven, Connecticut manufactures Marlin Rifles.

Over the company's 130+ years of firearms production, it has been best known for its manufacture of high power, center fire, lever action, and .22 caliber rim fire rifles. It has also made shot guns, that in many cases are the prized possessions in personal gun collections (many of which are of models that have been featured in such Hollywood movies as The Terminator and its sequels). It is the owner the firearm manufacturer H & R Firearms.

Contents [hide]
1 Products
2 MicroGroove Rifling
3 History
3.1 Early history
3.2 Newer history and leadership
3.3 Company expansion
4 See also
5 References
6 External links



[edit] Products
Major models of Marlin rifles include:

Marlin Model 1889 repeating rifle (featuring the 'Marlin Safety', the first side-ejecting cartridge mechanism)
Marlin Model 1895 Military Repeater
Marlin Model 25, a 22 Short, 22 Long, and 22 Long Rifle bolt-action rifle
Marlin Model 39A, lever action repeater, the longest continuously produced rifle in the world
Marlin Model 60, the most popular .22 LR caliber rifle in the world
Marlin Model 1894, lever action carbines in revolver calibers — .357 Magnum (1894C), .41 Magnum (1894FG), and .44 Magnum (1894SS or plain 1894)
Marlin Model 336, one of the most popular lever action hunting rifles in the world
Marlin Camp Carbine, a discontinued model
Marlin Model 70P "Papoose", a lightweight, magazine-fed, .22 LR carbine with a detachable barrel; it is designed to be taken down for easy transport while camping, backpacking, etc.
Significant variations of many of these rifles have usually also been manufactured. For example, there are 6 distinctly different variations currently manufactured for the Marlin Model 60.





[edit] MicroGroove Rifling
In 1953 Marlin Firearms was issued US Patent #3,100,358 for what was named MicroGroove Rifling which was a departure from the standard "Ballard" or cut rifling. The purpose of Microgroove Rifling was to increase the speed of producing rifle barrels.

Microgroove rifling is described in the patent as having 5 grooves for every 1/10th of an inch bore diameter, and that the driving side of each land would be "tangentially disposed" to prevent accumulating fouling in use.

Marlin introduced Microgroove rifling in their .22 rimfire barrels in July 1953, with 16 grooves that were .014" wide, and nominally .0015" deep. Ballard Rifled barrels have grooves generally in the range of .069-.090" wide, and .0015-.003" deep. This change was marketed in the 1954 Marlin catalog, as having numerous advantages that this new form of rifling had, including better accuracy, ease of cleaning, elimination of gas leakage, higher velocities and lower chamber pressures. The catalog also claimed that Microgroove Rifling did not distort the bullet jacket as deeply as Ballard Rifling hence improving accuracy.

Microgroove Rifles barrels have a reputation for accuracy problems with cast bullets due to the increased bore diameter generated by the shallow grooves. Use of oversized bullets has great effect on solving this problem, restoring accuracy to level seen from Ballard Rifled barrels. These grooves are inside the barrel and create more bullet spin. there is usually 16 groves in a standard 22 barrel. [1]


[edit] History
 

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Rifling - FirearmsID.comtry this link cast and see if it helps ya pard
 

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Ballard is a the rifling of most modern gun today , but a little deeper the normal for black powder and lead . Micro-groove are only a problem with lead like if the barrel is .357 and you shoot a .356 or small bullets and drive it fast and it don't like black powder either . Some of my best lead bullet targets are with a micro-barrel . The two guns below have NEVER lead up and NEVER see a brush in the bore , patches only . These are my SASS or CAS guns .



 

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Discussion Starter #20
...I'm looking at a 336W for $329........I've seen 336C and 336 CS and 336SC...I'm confoosed about the differences...the 336W has no pistol grip cap...a plain-Jane model...the others I don't know...can't find enough details on the website to understand the differences...I'd love to find a 336SS but not yet.....

Drummer, I've had the 1894 and 1894C...a couple of each...fine rifles...I'd like to have one of each in SS.....but I'd hang onto the 336...especially if it's an older model SS....the newer guns aren't the same quality...lots of issues these days...read on the Marlinowners.com forum and you'll see what I mean...I'd rather find old ones....

...been to the forum since I posted and got most of my answers on the different 336s...in a post....
 
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