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Discussion Starter #1
just won an auction on ebay for a lee torrent press, with 3 torrent plates. Look out everybody, i'll be asking bunches of questions when i get it set up..
 

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Very nice! I think you'll like the Lee. I know mine does everything it needs to. What calibers are you going to be reloading to start?
 

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.38 special, .357 magnum, .44 magnum

basically want to start with revolver rounds, i've heard they're more forgiving, and of course they seem to be the most expensive.

Main concern is if the press is functional. Ebay seller claims it is in good working order but ya never know.

also gotta get a powder measure scale and primer doohicky....sorry i'm a noob.

i'm pretty excited about it. Means i'll be able to shoot my SBH more. 30 bucks a box of 50 sucks.
 

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You're probably looking for the Lee safety prime then. I use the ram prime that came with the press. You can also use a hand prime if you want. Just depends on how you're going to be doing your reloading.

As far as scales go there are many to chose from. I ended up going with the RCBS Charge Master 1500. It's a great scale. I wanted the 750 but they didn't have one in stock. The 750 is about $100. The 1500 was $175. There are also lots of beam scales. Some are very inexpensive and some cost as much as the digitals. I wouldn't buy a digital off eBay. I'd buy new. You can probably score a good beam scale on eBay though.

I also buy my dies of eBay or Cabella's. I get the 4 die sets only so I can crimp on the last step. I use Lee carbide dies. They seem to work great and don't need lube.

Just ask a ton of questions. I did and eventually I started to reload. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #5
the one i purchased from ebay is a 3 die turrent press, would i still be able to use a crimping die. Would feel better if they are crimped
 

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The 3 die sets will seat and crimp at the same time. I believe. With more powerful loads you want to make sure you crimp well. The 357 loads may move forward and stop the rotation of your cylinder. Does the press come with dies? If you buy the 4 die sets you could always deprime or even crimp on a seperate single press. Or even a hand press. A always deprime all my brass before I start my reloading. Then it's charge, seat, crimp every bullet on the turret. This method works well for me right now and I'll adjust as I need to. You'll find what works best for you and then you'll change things around as you progess. Also post here and at .net in the classifieds for used scales and whatever else you may need. Lots of these guys have tons of stuff sitting around collecting dust. ;)
 

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i have used the plain vanilla lee pistol 3 die sets for years and i just adjust the bullet seating die to seat and crimp the bullet at the same time. Its a small pain in the a** to get it where you want it but once set, you'll not mess with it again. This is the way its been done for decades and still works well.

Suggest you stay with carbie dies for pistol rounds.

We recently got a 4 die set for the 45 colt and it is purty nice. If you just want to go with the 4 die set-up, i'd pick up a single stage press and as suggested re-size/decap at it or go to the other end of the process and crimp at it.

or if you wnat to "modernize", you can order a 4 die conversion kit to convert your 3 hole'er over to a four hole'er. Lee has these on sale right now for $20 which includes the different mount and a free die turret with it. http://www.leeprecision.com I have not tried the conversion kit but it looks purtystraight forward.

lee also has available instructions on their site from setting up the press and making adjustments to adjusting your dies and also help videos free on line to help out.
 

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Get the Lee Safety Prime...I have one and I love it. I used to use a hand primer and did not like it....always afraid they were going to blow. The safety prime is the cat's meow...just push in and down, it sets the primer in a holder and primes on the downstroke.... :D
 

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Discussion Starter #9
i got it in the mail yesterday, everything looks to be in order. I do have a question about something, but i can't get to my camera right now. I'll post a picture latter this evening, I hope. Everything is really busy lately.
 

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Post the pic when ya can and we'll try to answer your question. You need a balance beam scale, and an electronic (only because the electronic is much faster). I have the RCBS 750, and it works great. Check with Lee, but I'm almost certain the 4 hole disk will work in your turret. From the pics on Lee's website, it looks like I actually have the Turret Press instead of the Classic Turret Press, and I am using the 4 hole disk. If so, then when you order the dies, order the 4 die sets. A little more expensive, but, you also get the Lee Factory crimp die......much easier when the crimp is in another step.....
 

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If you decide to get an electronic scale stay away from the Cabelas branded scales as they are useless. Spend the money on an RCBS 1500 and you can upgrade later with the powder dispenser. Lyman and Hornaday also make decent scales and I know Lyman offers a system similar to the RCBS chargemaster system so if you decide on a lyman I would get the one compatable with their system. If you start with a balance beam scale you will save some money and they have worked well for a very long time.

I got a bench mounted primer system on e-bay and do my priming off line. I like how it works.

If you haven't purchased a manual yet then that is really the first step. The manuals will answer a lot of your questions and they stress the most important element of reloading-safety. I started with the Speer manual for no particular reason and have added Sierra and Nosler in addition to other books on the subject. Buy a good current manual and work within the limits they establish and you will enjoy a great hobby. Good luck.
 
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